Tag Archives: indian

The Vibes On The Beach – Chennai , Tamilnadu

The beach is not only known as a place to relax ,but as a place for the artists. Many of times you see artist portraying the beach with their paintings, photographs or by singing about its magnificence and its splendor. No matter how descriptive nor how detailed the picture is though it can never capture the beauty that the beach really holds. Below curated photographs represent the different moods of the chennai beach in different seasons . Thank you Participants for the wonderful response

Photo Credits : Saravanan Ekambaram

Photo Credits : saravanan krishnamoorthy

Photo Credits : Lakshmi Raman

Photo Credits : Bharath Kumar

Photo Credits : Ramesh Raja

Photo Credits : Mustansir M Lokhandwala

Photo Credits : Siva Prasad

Photo Credits : Deepak Sundar

Photo Credits : Prasanna Rangarajan

Photo Credits : Viknesh Vicky

Photo Credits : Siva Prasad

Photo Credits : Saravanan Ekambaram

Photo Credits : Augustin Samraj

Indian Youth Conclave Second Edition – Chennai, India

The second edition of the Youth convention popularly known as the IYC, organized by The Climber, on the 25th of September at Chinmaya Heritage Center, Chetpet. The theme of the event was being curated around the concept of “inspiration live and up-front”. The event featured some of the fine speakers and workshops from the conventional and un-conventional fields from music and dance to entrepreneurship and technology.
Coming to the organizers, The Climber is an IIM Bangalore incubated startup and was awarded the best early stage startup by Bzz Wings 2015. The Climber has also been recognized as one of the 10 best startups by TATA First Dot NEN. We have our chapters in 13 cities all over the country.They are a youth driven organization that focuses on helping students discover and pursue their passion. We connect young minds with wacky ideas, to encouraging mentors who help channelize them in the right direction.
The idea was for the youth to get inspired by the journey of people who are successful by following their passion.
The event kicked off with some enlightening speeches from Parvathi Nayar, Vikas Chawla and Sahithya Jagganathan. Their emphasis was solely on inspiring budding entrepreneurs to break outside their comfort zone and pursue their passion with girth and determination.

This was shortly followed by a stand up comedy act by Stray Factory.We were entertainments with some music and dance performances by youngsters.

Apart from this, the backstage events were happening simultaneously. Jam sessions, art and photography exhibitions and micro fiction counters were put up. The eye catcher was however the captain’s corner where the participants could interact with the mentors.
This was complemented by some eye-catching graffiti featured on the walls and photographs.

On the whole, the event was thoroughly educational with a lot of takeaways. It is indeed inspiring to see young professionals conduct events on a grand scale.

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An article by Pavithraa Swaminathan and Photographs by Srivatsan Sankaran. A special thanks to Anirban Saha, Founder Kolkata bloggers for inviting us .

zero hour

Zero-Hour

In the light of some of the incidents in this beautiful city, we are forced to confront and question some of the basic moral values which have governed us humans.

A dark day

It was a beautiful morning and the day looked promising enough to be called a fitting run-up to a well-earned weekend. It is not always one gets the luxury of a day off. It was something that I was looking forward for a long time.

What began as a normal day, turned out to one of the worst days ever. A girl of 24 was hacked to death, in broad daylight, at one of the busiest suburban stations of the city. Reportedly she bled to death with several onlookers apparently stunned to act.

Her dad had just dropped her off the station. Did he know that he was seeing her for the last time? Did she know that she was getting off that bike once and for all? Did her mom know that she would never get to pack her daughter’s lunch ever again? I hope her sibling knew that he played his best pranks with her the night before, for she would be gone to dust the next day.

What really killed her?

What really made me feel miserable was the public apathy that apparently killed the girl. It was neither an ungodly hour nor was it a deserted place for it to happen. (I am not justifying the relevance of deserted places, people). She was lying in a pool of her own blood while all those people were reportedly shocked to react. She was probably rewinding her own life in those last moments, trying to find one instance where she had hurt someone, knowingly or unknowingly. She was probably begging God to spare her life, to live with her family, that she had loved all her life.

Would the onlookers have been handicapped and stunted in a similar way if that woman in a pool of blood was their own sister? Mother? A friend at least?? What caused this lack of humanity? Was their job and deadline more important than that life which was on the brink of death?

People talk a lot, but when it comes to the zero-hour effect, they seem surprisingly hypocritical. This is a city which had shown immense courage and grit at the face of a natural calamity. When faced with a man made atrocity, we failed big time. I am quite sure as to we will still fail in future, because we are such hypocrites. We take pride in clapping for those bravery award winners, yet we don’t care about the soul that is possibly begging for the boon of life in front of our eyes.

The reaction

Enough posts have been made, shocked expressions and proud exclamations made and written, criticizing, condemning, demeaning the witnesses for shaming us with their mere existence. And some of them go to the extent of making grand statements of how they were not present in the scene to make their classic hero move.

Now this drives us to the fundamentals – In the face of a crime scene, how does the person react?

To run would be the first thing any of us can think of. While some may just decide to be a passive spectator to the incidents going on.

But the irony of this incident is, even while help was available, nobody was prepared to lend that to the girl. Brutal, yes! We are just gearing up for a long debate, both the sides of the party arguing for the cause they believe in.

That apart, what actually brought this? Have we humans shrunk to such a low level, that we would rather see a fellow human die in front of our own eyes, than get our hands stained in the process?

Calls for some sensible action rather than debates and arguments.

A look into the human psyche

Meera Shivashanker, a psychologist cum writer in Chennai, throws some light on the incident.

“I think for one it happened too fast, and the gore and shock of it all was too much to take. Nobody expected this. People in India are scared of being stuck in the long processes in the name of judicial processes in our country. People who want to do the right thing are harassed, and they probably get threats from police and the other side. Their lives become a never ending circle of courtrooms, police station and what not.”

So judicial procedures and regulations are one thing whereas, what does an average human being in his senses go through when he faces a situation of this kind?

“From the human psyche perspective I think its self-preservation. Protection of the self. And, fear. The sight of blood always stops people in their tracks and their immediate instinct is to back off”.

On a positive note, she concludes saying there needs to be a significant shift in the mind-set. With specific reference to certain countries abroad, people have witness protection programmes and others which give us the assurance we mostly need.

Shift in the mind-set is easier said than done. And in a country driven by customs, we find it hard to break out of routine.

“Also media plays a key role here” says Selvam, an MBA grad residing in Chennai. “Our minds have become suppressed and we have been made to believe to expect an external person to jump in and raise a voice against wrong doings. Movies often portray a single person as a hero, by dimming the limelight on the surrounding ones. So subconsciously, we have learnt to accept what is happening to us and expecting an external person to take the lead and raise a voice against it. By that, we have truly become impotent.”

Making a first move requires a lot of courage, not just to face the complications, but also other questions thrown upon by spectators.

“Our Duty has become your duty” where we have gone to the level of questioning the ones who get down on the field to lend a helping hand.

The law is on your side

Above said, conditions have improved considerably with respect to judicial and legal procedures in India. Persons directly involved in offering help to the victims are protected from all legal complications. They don’t face any charges either directly or indirectly unless there are reasons to believe otherwise. This comes in the wake of a recent Supreme Court directive issued in order to protect those Good Samaritans who come forward to help those in distress. Although this directive is focused majorly on road accidents and the like, we have a reason to rejoice that the judiciary has its heart in the right place when it comes to issues like this.

Introspection

How one should react in this a situation can’t be mandated, but when one is faced with a crime situation or sees somebody getting victimized, don’t hesitate to step in. You have the law to protect you. Anyway this is not the kind of atmosphere or mind-set that we must be proud to live in. Stepping up at the right time, goes a long way in setting up an example to the society. If change doesn’t come from within, where else would it come from?

I think it is time to take a few minutes off from our seemingly busy lives and introspect. There is nothing wrong in seeking materialistic wealth, but is it worth at all at the cost of lives? This is just not the legacy that we are supposed to leave behind fellas!

Like charity, let compassion also begin from home.

An article by Megha Sreeram and Pavithraa Swaminathan. Edited and curated by Kishor Lakshminarayanan.

yoga champion

15 Minutes with Avanthika, The Young International Yoga Champion 2016

Yoga is a physical, mental, and spiritual practice or discipline which originated in India. Among the most well-known types of yoga are Hatha yoga and Raja yoga

An art for the mind, soul and body. A very peaceful art which requires constant dedication and extraordinary skills to master in it .

With the chill morning summer breeze, in Neelankarai beach, Madras Photo Bloggers,MPB interviewed the eight year old Avanthika, a Gold Medal winner in the International Yoga Championship.

She is naughty, witty and hyper but just wait until she is instructed to do an Aasana. ( a yoga posture)

Her way of greeting the waves and her friendly battle with the sand showcases her age but one can rapidly see her personality change when she is told to perform yoga. She sits in padmasana with sheer elegance, maturity and curved happy lips.

She tries to fit herself into her large “Indian Jersey” as she sits with us for a small chat.

1) Yoga is a very seemingly boring task for even a 30 year old. Being a 8 year old, an age of full energy., how did u fall in love with a calm and peaceful art? 

“I started Yoga only because I was highly energetic and flexible”,she says as she bursts out laughing.

“I started learning yoga since my 1st grade and I never find it boring, Indeed I’m very naughty during my class hours. My class is packed with elder people and they deal with me very patiently and never scold me”, she adds on with a blush. “I like yoga because I win in it”, she says with a naughty grin.

2) Competing with students of my class still awakens the butterflies in my stomach. How is that you being an 8 year old took it sportive and face people from around the world with such courage?

“As I entered the auditorium I never felt nervous , Instead, I felt happy that I’m going to challenge unknown people. I was never scared looking at unfamiliar faces challenging me as they can possible do nothing that can scare me”, she says as she starts playing with her hair.

” Avanthika participated along with 150 other participants who belonged to 6 different countries and won Gold medal followed by Singapore”, adds her mom beaming with pride.

3) Who is your guruji and how supportive was he/she in this competition? Who supported u a lot from your family?

“My teacher is Dhanalalshmi ma’am. Maariappan sir took me to the competition. My parents and teachers were super supportive and encouraging”,she says.

4) Wearing the Indian jersey and holding a golden medal in the hand is everyone’s dream and aim. How great does it feel to be achieving at such a young age?

” Romba happy aa irruku”, she says and ends the question. This shows us clearly how much she doesn’t understand her own achievements.

” She won in the state level competition in Coimbatore and won Gold medal followed by Nationals in Kovilpatti where she won Gold medal again and then she attended the international championship in Indonesia where she once more won Gold medal” adds her mother.

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5) Did u feel bad when you didn’t get enough recognition from the press?

“Nobody approached us and we felt very sad. But, who in the present society is paying any attention to vedic art?” Ankita’s sister questions us with frustration.

6)what would you like to grow up and do? Will you take up yoga as passion or as career?

“Yoga will be my forever mate but not my profession” she says as she hops and runs away chasing crabs.
Team MPB is very happy to interview such a young talent.

Interview by Jaya Roshini 

Photos by Kirbaakaran